Friday, June 8, 2018

Art Gallery - Taiwan National Palace Museum: Gallery 205c (Magic Of The Kneaded Clay 04)

You are at - Jotaro's Blog / Footsteps-Cycling Taiwan 2017 / Art Gallery Taiwan Art / Taiwan National Palace Museum / 2nd Floor / Gallery 205c     |     Go To 201 / 203a / 203b /203c / 205a / 205b / 205d205e / 205f / 212 / 1st Flr / 3rd Flr
                    Footsteps - Jotaro's Travels                        
Taiwan National Palace Museum: 2nd Floor Gallery 205c
(Magic Of The Kneaded Clay 04) - November 2017
Yixing teapot (宜興) with flowers - Yixing ware (宜興泥) in Fallangcai polychrome enamels,  Qing Dynasty (清朝) (1644-1912), Emperor Kangxi (康熙) (1654–1722) Reign (1662–1722)
The National Palace Museum, located in Taipei and TaibaoTaiwan, has a permanent collection of nearly 700,000 pieces of ancient Chinese imperial artifacts and artworks. Gallery 205c (Magic Of The Kneaded Clay 04) covers pottery produced during the reign of Emperor Kangxi (康熙) (1654–1722), reign (1662–1722) of the Qing Dynasty (清朝) (1644-1912).


This blog comes in several pages, this is Gallery 205c of the second floor galleries, click below to navigate to other sections:
Go To 3rd Flr

Go to 2nd Flr 205b           |        Go To 2nd Flr Main        |         Go to 2nd Flr 205d >

Go To 1st Flr

Emperor Kangxi, whose personal was name Xuanye, was the fourth emperor of the Qing DynastyHis reign of 61 years makes him the longest-reigning emperor in Chinese history (although his grandson, the Emperor Qianlong, had the longest period of de facto power). However, since he ascended the throne at the age of seven, actual power was held for six years by four regents and his grandmother, the Grand Empress Dowager XiaozhuangHe is considered one of China's greatest emperors. He suppressed the Revolt of the Three Feudatories, forced the Kingdom of Tungning in Taiwan and assorted Mongol rebels in the North and Northwest to submit to Qing rule, and blocked Tsarist Russia on the Amur River, retaining Outer Manchuria and Outer Northwest China.
During his reign, special workshops were created for work with colourful enamel on porcelain. Pottery made during this period include the following type and finishing:
a) Yixing ware (宜興泥) is made of clay from the region near the city of Yixing in Jiangsu Province, which was used in Chinese pottery since the Song dynasty (960–1279) when Yixing clay was first mined around China's Lake Tai. From the 17th century on, Yixing wares were commonly exported to Europe. The finished stoneware, which is used for teaware and other small items, is usually red or brown in color. Also known as zisha ware (宜興紫砂), they are typically left unglazed and use clays that are very cohesive and can form coils, slabs and most commonly slip casts. These clays can also be formed by throwing. The best known wares made from Yixing clay are Yixing clay teapotstea pets, and other teaware.
b) Falangcai polychrome enamels is enamel color for porcelain which means foreign color.
c) Wucai (五彩, "Five colours") is a style of Chinese porcelain. It normally uses white for the porcelain, blue for the design outline, and red, green, and yellow for the designs. It has its origins in Doucai.
Famille verte (康熙五彩, Kangxi wucai, also 素三彩, Susancai), adopted in the Kangxi period (1662–1722), uses green and iron red with other overglaze colours developed from Wucai.
In Japan it is pronounced gosai and was initially imported. Kinrande is a form that developed out of this during the Ming dynasty.
d) Blue and white porcelain (青花, Qīng-huā) covers a wide range of white pottery and porcelain decorated under the glaze with a blue pigment, generally cobalt oxide. The decoration is commonly applied by hand, originally by brush painting. Blue and white decoration first became widely used in Chinese porcelain in the 14th century, after the cobalt pigment for the blue began to be imported from Persia.

Bowl with peony scrolls in yellow background 


Bowl with lotus on yellow background Falangcai polychrome enamels.

Bowl with lotus on yellow background Falangcai painted enamels.


Bowl with flowers in red background Falangcai painted enamels.


Yixing teapot (宜興) with flowers - Yixing ware (宜興泥) in Fallangcai polychrome enamels.
Yixing clay teapots (宜興) (also called Purple Sand (紫砂zǐshā) are made from Yixing clay (宜興泥). This traditional style commonly used to brew tea, originated in China, dating back to the 15th century, and are made from clay produced near Yixing in the eastern Chinese province of Jiangsu.
Yixing teapots are meant for use with black and oolong teas, as well as aged pǔ’ěr tea. They can also be used for green or white tea, but the water must be allowed to cool to around 85 °C (185 °F) before pouring the water into the pot. Yixing teapots absorb a tiny amount of tea into the pot during brewing. After prolonged use, the pot will develop a coating that retains the flavour and colour of the tea.

Close up view of the lid of the Yixing teapot (宜興) with flowers - Yixing ware (宜興泥) in Fallangcai polychrome enamels. For close up view of the whole pot, see the top-most photo.

Censer with open-work design - Wucai (五彩) polychrome pottery.

Planter with decoration of flowers and birds Wucai (五彩) polychrome pottery.

Jar in sky blue glaze.

Square vase with animal mask in turquoise blue glaze.

Brush holder with landscape - polychrome pottery iunder green glaze.

Washer basin in the shape of petals with ladies - Blue and white porcelain (青花, Qīng-huā) porcelain.

Vase with landscape - Blue and white porcelain (青花, Qīng-huā) porcelain.

Plate with polychrome flowers and fruits.

Vase with flowers and butterflies in yellow background - polychrome pottery.


Plate with decoration of a dragon - Wucai (五彩) polychrome pottery.


Vase with red dragons in pale-green underglaze.


Cover jar with decoration of red dragon and phoenix Wucai (五彩) polychrome pottery.


Plate with green and brown dragons in yellow background.


White porcelain elephant with an enamel bottle on its back

This blog comes in several pages, this is Gallery 205c of the second floor galleries, click below to navigate to other sections:
Go To 3rd Flr
Go to 2nd Flr 205b           |        Go To 2nd Flr Main        |         Go to 2nd Flr 205d >
Go To 1st Flr


Second Floor Layout Plan National Palace Museum Taipei
_________________________________________________________________________

National Palace Museum
(國立故宮博物院)
No. 221, Sec 2, Zhi Shan Rd, Shilin District, Taipei City, Taiwan 111.
Entry fee: NTD 250
Hours:
Sundays to Thursdays: 8:30am to 6:30pm     |     Fridays & Saturdays: 8:30am to 9:00pm
Website: https://www.npm.gov.tw/en/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/npmgov/
GPS & Direction Map: 25.10235, 121.54849

(Click here for interactive Google Street View)




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Taiwan Art @ Taiwan's National Palace Museum (國立故宮博物院)


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You are at - Jotaro's Blog / Footsteps-Cycling Taiwan 2017 / Art Gallery Taiwan Art / Taiwan National Palace Museum / 2nd Floor / Gallery 205c     |     Go To 201 / 203a / 203b /203c / 205a / 205b / 205d / 205e / 205f / 212 / 1st Flr / 3rd Flr
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