Saturday, June 9, 2018

Art Gallery - Taiwan National Palace Museum: Gallery 205e (Magic Of The Kneaded Clay 06)

You are at - Jotaro's Blog / Footsteps-Cycling Taiwan 2017 / Art Gallery Taiwan Art / Taiwan National Palace Museum / 2nd Floor / Gallery 205e     |     Go To 201 / 203a / 203b /203c / 205a / 205b / 205c / 205d / 205f / 212 / 1st Flr / 3rd Flr
                    Footsteps - Jotaro's Travels                        
Taiwan National Palace Museum: 2nd Floor Gallery 205e
(Magic Of The Kneaded Clay 06) - November 2017
Teapot with red carved lacquer-ware - imitation Yixing ware (宜興泥), Qing Dynasty, Emperor Qianlong (乾隆) reign.
The National Palace Museum, located in Taipei and TaibaoTaiwan, has a permanent collection of nearly 700,000 pieces of ancient Chinese imperial artifacts and artworks. Gallery 205e (Magic Of The Kneaded Clay 06) covers pottery produced during the reign of Emperor Qianlong (乾隆) (1711–1799), reign (17351796) of the Qing Dynasty (清朝) (1644–1912).


This blog comes in several pages, this is Gallery 205e of the second floor galleries, click below to navigate to other sections:
Go To 3rd Flr

Go to 2nd Flr 205d           |        Go To 2nd Flr Main        |          Go to 2nd Flr 205f >

Go To 1st Flr

Emperor Qianlong (乾隆) was the sixth emperor of the Manchu-led Qing Dynasty. Born Hongli, the fourth son of the Emperor Yongzheng, he reigned officially from 11 October 1735 to 8 February 1796. He abdicated in favour of his son, the Emperor Jiaqing – a filial act in order not to reign longer than his grandfather, the illustrious Emperor Kangxi. Despite his retirement, however, he retained ultimate power as the Emperor Emeritus (太上皇) until his death in 1799; he thus was the longest-reigning de facto ruler in the history of China, and dying at the age of 87, the longest-living. As a capable and cultured ruler inheriting a thriving empire, during his long reign the Qing Empire reached its most splendid and prosperous era, boasting a large population and economy. As a military leader, he led military campaigns expanding the dynastic territory to the largest extent by conquering and sometimes destroying Central Asian kingdoms.
He had an insatiable appetite for collecting, and acquired much of China's "great private collections" by any means necessary, and "reintegrated their treasures into the imperial collection." The Emperor Qianlong, more than any other Manchu emperor, lavished the imperial collection with his attention and efforts.

 Pottery made or collected during this period included the following type and finishing:
a) Yixing ware (宜興泥) is made of clay from the region near the city of Yixing in Jiangsu Province, which was used in Chinese pottery since the Song Dynasty (960–1279) when Yixing clay was first mined around China's Lake Tai. From the 17th century on, Yixing wares were commonly exported to Europe. The finished stoneware, which is used for teaware and other small items, is usually red or brown in color. Also known as zisha ware (宜興紫砂), they are typically left unglazed and use clays that are very cohesive and can form coils, slabs and most commonly slip casts. These clays can also be formed by throwing. The best known wares made from Yixing clay are Yixing clay teapotstea pets, and other teaware.
b) Famille rose, Fencai (粉彩) (also known as Ruancai (軟彩), meaning 'soft colours', and later as Yangcai (洋彩), meaning 'foreign colours') was introduced during the reign of the Emperor Kangxi (1654–1722), possibly around 1720. It used mainly pink or purple and remained popular throughout the 18th and the 19th centuries, also being widely adopted by European factories. Famille rose enamel ware allows a greater range of colour and tone than was previously possible, enabling the depiction of more complex images, including flowers, figures and insects.
c) Falangcai polychrome enamels is enamel color for porcelain which means foreign color.
d) Blue and white porcelain (青花, Qīng-huā) covers a wide range of white pottery and porcelain decorated under the glaze with a blue pigment, generally cobalt oxide. The decoration is commonly applied by hand, originally by brush painting. Blue and white decoration first became widely used in Chinese porcelain in the 14th century, after the cobalt pigment for the blue began to be imported from Persia.

Foliate plate with coat of arms of de Fougeray family - gold & Fencai (粉彩) polychrome enamel porcelain.

Plate with Herzeele family coat of arms - gold & Fencai (粉彩) polychrome enamel porcelain.

Plate with geometrical pattern - gold & Fencai (粉彩) polychrome enamel porcelain.

Teapot with red carved lacquer-ware - an imitation of Yixing ware (宜興泥) from the Song Dynasty (960–1279) period.

Covered bowl with red carved lacquerware - an imitation of Yixing ware (宜興泥) from the Song Dynasty (960–1279) period.

Mini stupa Fencai (粉彩) polychrome enamel porcelain.

Flower vase seven-neck body and Indian lotus scrolls - gold on dark blue glaze porcelain.

Stemcup with birds and flowers - Falangcai polychrome enamels porcelain.

 Bowl with  of Indian lotus scrolls - white glaze porcelain with translucent openwork design.

Bowl with Indian lotus scrolls on black background Falangcai polychrome enamels porcelain.

Garlic head-shaped vase with rendering of willows and swallows Falangcai polychrome enamels porcelain.

Covered twin-shaped vase with birds and flowers pattern Fencai (粉彩) polychrome enamel porcelain.

Gourd-shaped vase with two ears, and European women and floral decorations Falangcai polychrome enamels porcelain.

Vase with twin dragon-shaped ears and European lady set in country scenery Falangcai polychrome enamels porcelain.

Vase with two ruyi-shaped handles and hundred long life charactersQīng-huā (青花) Blue and white porcelain.


Vase with decoration of peaches  decoration Fencai (粉彩) polychrome enamel porcelain.


Revolving vase with swimming fish in cobalt blue glaze.


Hatstand with openwork of dragon and clouds Fencai (粉彩) polychrome enamel porcelain.


Vase with rotating interior and openwork Pa Kua (八卦, eight trigram) & ruyi motifs Fencai (粉彩) polychrome enamel porcelain.


This blog comes in several pages, this is Gallery 205e of the second floor galleries, click below to navigate to other sections:
Go to 2nd Flr 205d           |        Go To 2nd Flr Main        |          Go to 2nd Flr 205f >
Go To 1st Flr


Second Floor Layout Plan National Palace Museum Taipei
_________________________________________________________________________

National Palace Museum
(國立故宮博物院)
No. 221, Sec 2, Zhi Shan Rd, Shilin District, Taipei City, Taiwan 111.
Entry fee: NTD 250
Hours:
Sundays to Thursdays: 8:30am to 6:30pm     |     Fridays & Saturdays: 8:30am to 9:00pm
Website: https://www.npm.gov.tw/en/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/npmgov/
GPS & Direction Map: 25.10235, 121.54849

(Click here for interactive Google Street View)




Related & Similar Blogs :

Taiwan Art @ Taiwan's National Palace Museum (國立故宮博物院)


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You are at - Jotaro's Blog / Footsteps-Cycling Taiwan 2017 / Art Gallery Taiwan Art / Taiwan National Palace Museum / 2nd Floor / Gallery 205e     |     Go To 201 / 203a / 203b /203c / 205a / 205b / 205c / 205d / 205f / 212 / 1st Flr / 3rd Flr
If you like this, view my other blogs at Jotaro's Blog
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